Hotel business travel revenue will be down in 2022.

While the hospitality industry is beginning to rebound as the pandemic seems to wane, hotel business travel is still taking time to recover. (See also Infographic on page 38.) According to a report issued by the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA), leisure travel is expected to return to pre-pandemic levels this year. However, the 2022 report projects that hotel business travel revenue will be down 23% from 2019, which equates to a $20-billion decrease.

Some states are disproportionately impacted. New York, Massachusetts, Illinois, New Jersey, California, Maryland, Minnesota, and Washington are among the states projected to end 2022 with the largest percentage declines in hotel business travel.

Michigan is expected to end the year with a revenue decline of 16%—down from $1.454 billion in 2019 revenues to $1.222 billion in 2022.

“While dwindling COVID-19 case counts and relaxed CDC guidelines are providing a sense of optimism for reigniting travel, this report underscores how tough it will be for many hotels and hotel employees to recover from years of lost revenue,” notes Chip Rogers, president and CEO of AHLA. “The good news is that after two years of virtual work arrangements, Americans recognize the unmatched value of face-to-face meetings and say they are ready to start getting back on the road for business travel.”

MACVB Annual Educational Conference finally reaches the shores of Mackinac Island.

As I rode in the carriage from the Shepler’s Ferry terminal to the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island, my mind wandered to a scene from “Monty Python and the Holy Grail.” In said scene, King Arthur and his sidekick, Patsy, approach a castle while galloping and banging coconuts together. After a few moments passed and my mind wandered back to the tree-lined streets of the island, I realized it was the clippety-clop of the draft horses pulling our carriage that brought on my thoughts of Python.

 

SCS Global Services (SCS), a third-party environmental and sustainability certification, auditing, testing, and standards development, has launched its Zero Waste Standard, “Zero Waste for Events.”

 

The Events Industry Council’s Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) program, established in 1985, is recognized around the world as a badge of excellence in the events industry. JodieAnn Cady, an independent event project manager based in Mason, is among the professionals in the inaugural class of CMP Fellows, a program launched last year.