• Attend launched the next version of its event management platform

     
    FROM THE Spring 2016 ISSUE
     

Attend, which started as an app designed to check in attendees, has expanded to help planners foster engagement and track everything during the planning stages. The company is offering a solution for users who want more connection between planners and their attendees.

“Attend is the only app designed to empower internal members of the event team or sales organization at a company to better engage with event attendees,” says Eric Bisceglia, vice president of product and engineering.

The app gives users the ability to take notes directly and save them in one place, making it easy to stay organized. The newest update, in December, made it easier to track conversations with suppliers and follow up on activities, all from the event floor.

The app also helps businesses increase marketing effectiveness and sales at events. “We make it easy to create a list of favorite registrants,” Bisceglia says, “so that leadership and business development teams can easily manage which of their key prospects or customers are in the room.”

Michigan’s vibrant art and culture offerings are a big part of what makes the state so attractive as a meetings destination.

To support these assets, the Michigan Arts and Culture Council (MACC) coordinates several grants to arts and culture organizations, cities and municipalities, and other nonprofit organizations “ensuring that every citizen and community in Michigan enjoys the civic, economic and educational benefits of arts and culture.”

 

In the upcoming Spring issue of Michigan Meetings + Events, you’ll find an exclusive interview with the authors of Suddenly Hybrid: Managing the Modern Meeting (Wiley). Emmy-winning broadcaster Karin M. Reed and Joseph A. Allen, Ph.D., a leading expert on workplace meetings, offer a guide to navigating the new normal of meetings where some attendees are in the room and others are Zooming in from remote locations. 

Here’s a preview of the strategies that make hybrid meetings work for team leaders, according to Reed and Allen:

 

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices.