• Bees on the Roof Leads to Tours for Guests at the Daxton in Birmingham

     
    POSTED August 4, 2022
     
  • Bees on the Roof Leads to Tours for Guests at the Daxton in Birmingham

     
    POSTED August 4, 2022
     
  • Bees on the Roof Leads to Tours for Guests at the Daxton in Birmingham

     
    POSTED August 4, 2022
     
  • Bees on the Roof Leads to Tours for Guests at the Daxton in Birmingham

     
    POSTED August 4, 2022
     
  • Bees on the Roof Leads to Tours for Guests at the Daxton in Birmingham

     
    POSTED August 4, 2022
     

The Daxton in Birmingham is creating a buzz over bees.

Bees in the D has put two hives on the roof of the upscale hotel. The nonprofit works with multiple partners to maintain hives in some 70 different places around metro Detroit that include several with green roofs — the Daxton being one. 

“Our green roof is nearly 2,000 square feet that is largely covered in sedum and garlic chive,” says Daxton Marketing Director Josh Griffin. “The green roof has been part of our hotel since we opened in April 2021 and is a great place for the bees to reside.”

In fact, several rooms overlook the Daxton’s green roof, meaning those guests can view the hives every time they look out their windows.

That said, the Daxton took it a step further by rolling out scheduled bee tours.

“We decided to incorporate tours as part of the package we offer guests, because seeing how the bees work in person is an experience that everyone should witness firsthand,” Griffin says. “The second reason we decided to offer tours is because education about bees is extremely important, and we at the Daxton want to do our part to help spread that education and awareness about our bee population.”

Bees in the D Co-founder Brian Peterson-Roest leads the tours, which have participants getting suited up in protective wear and spending time learning about the bees as part of the experience.

“I share a little bit more about some of the misconceptions of bees, why bees are important to both our food industry and our ecosystem,” he says. “We’ll actually open up the hives and I will show them how basically the hive works.”

That means pointing out the worker bees, which are all female. Peterson-Roest also shows visitors the drone, the slightly larger male bee.

“We’ll also be talking about equipment, about why bees make honey, how they make honey, and why we’re fortunate enough to get honey from them because they’re very productive and usually make more than what they need to survive the wintertime,” he says. 

Griffin says that when the honey is harvested, the Daxton expects to incorporate it into several menu items including desserts and beverages.

“It will also be available for drinks like tea, but it also pairs well with the creation of certain cocktails,” Griffin says. “Who knows? We might even craft a special honey cocktail in honor of our partnership with Bees in the D.”

 

Tanner Comes Home to Grand Rapids

 

Michigan hospitality industry professionals were recognized by the Michigan Restaurant & Lodging Association (MRLA) for being top leaders during its annual Stars of the Industry Awards Dinner held recently at St. John’s Resort in Plymouth.

“It’s a wonderful occasion to be able to celebrate the achievements of some of the finest in our industry,” says MRLA President and CEO Justin Winslow. “These individuals have made an impact on the guest experience, their coworkers, and respective organizations.”

 

Marcy Simpson is the new executive director of the Southwestern Michigan Tourist Council. A lifelong southwest Michigan resident, she succeeds Millicent Huminsky, who recently retired after serving the council for 37 years. Brandi Tucker has been appointed to fill Simpson’s previous role as office manager. Sarah Steffens has also joined the organization, replacing Tucker as group sales and marketing coordinator.