Courtesy of Iron Gate Bar Wyandotte

“The Carrot Boi is what we call our signature drink here at the Iron Gate because it’s both unique and tasty,” according to the Iron Gate food and beverage team. “During a staff meeting, we were experimenting with drinks, and once we came up with the ingredients, we had to decide on a name for the drink. It became a staff inside joke to name it the Carrot Boi. It has since become the most popular cocktail on our menu and one of our favorites to make!”

 

Ingredients

—1.5 ounces Tito’s

Handmade Vodka

—.5 ounce carrot syrup

—.5 ounce ginger syrup

—.75 ounce lemon juice

—1 ounce pineapple juice

 

Carrot Syrup or Ginger Syrup:

—1/2 cup carrot juice or

   1/2 cup ginger juice

—1/2 cup granulated sugar

 

Instructions

Syrup: Combine carrot juice or ginger juice and sugar in saucepan. Bring to a boil. Let cool down, and then pour into a glass jar. Syrup can be stored in refrigerator for two to three weeks.

Cocktail: Combine all cocktail ingredients in a shaker tin, fill with ice and shake. Add crushed ice into a Collins glass, and double strain ingredients from shaker into glass. Top with a little more crushed ice and garnish with mint and a pineapple frond. 

The Events Industry Council’s Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) program, established in 1985, is recognized around the world as a badge of excellence in the events industry. JodieAnn Cady, an independent event project manager based in Mason, is among the professionals in the inaugural class of CMP Fellows, a program launched last year.

 

Located in Onekama and built in 1900 as the summer residence of lumber baron and Manistee Mayor Charles Canfield, Canfield House was purchased, completely renovated, and reopened as a year-round bed-and-breakfast in 2021. Featuring 200 feet of Portage Lake frontage, the property now offers a lakeside fire ring and new dock for kayaks and stand-up paddleboards. The six-room house can be rented for small retreats and groups up to 125 accommodated for meetings and receptions.

 

Meeting on the Farm, Part One