• EventCollab: A Deeper Dive into the Winter 2017 Infographic

     
    POSTED February 1, 2017
     

In our Winter 2017 issues, we’re featuring the tech companies that were part of the 2016 ibtm America TechCollective in partnership with DAHLIA+. Because we can only fit so much in print, read on here for our full interview with Megan Powers, marketing director, EventCollab.

EventCollab is an event-planning software created for event people by event people, filling the need for a tool that makes for easy collaboration with all stakeholders.

What are some of EventCollab’s outstanding features for meeting/event planners?

EventCollab provides one location online where all stakeholders involved in planning and managing events can share documents, assign ToDos, hold discussions, track time, and easily manage all logistics—all in the cloud.

The favorite feature with our clients is the Google drive integration. Because it’s right inside, there’s no need to go outside of the program to create, open, and edit Google docs. Because of this integration there’s no wondering whether you have the latest version of a budget or a schedule—all the version history is right there. We have more integrations coming with Salesforce, Slack, and Microsoft 360.

What was the inspiration for starting EventCollab?

Our founder and CEO (Tommy Melancon) has an event production services company, and EventCollab was borne out of necessity. They needed an event project management tool that provided the permissions and functionality his team needed to efficiently and collaboratively manage events, so they built it. Once they realized how much their clients liked using it, they decided to build it for the industry-at-large. We’ve been in business since 2014 (starting with a small module called Showbook), and we officially launched the EventCollab event project management tool in June of 2015.

Do you have any numbers/figures/percentages you can share related to the technology that would interest planners?

We have more than 1,500 registered users, and more than 2,000 events have been managed using EventCollab.

Here’s a part of a testimonial we received recently from a Director, Show Operations for PRG.

“We had a very large booth for Airbus Helicopter. We were coordinating with designers in 3 states and the client. We also had to submit documents to the show organizer and decorator. We did this all through EventCollab. With all of the documentation where we needed it and proof that the right people had seen the information we were able to save $60K on final billing, not to mention the efficiency that it afforded the project team.

EventCollab is now our only project management tool—all of our projects go through this software.”

Michigan’s vibrant art and culture offerings are a big part of what makes the state so attractive as a meetings destination.

To support these assets, the Michigan Arts and Culture Council (MACC) coordinates several grants to arts and culture organizations, cities and municipalities, and other nonprofit organizations “ensuring that every citizen and community in Michigan enjoys the civic, economic and educational benefits of arts and culture.”

 

In the upcoming Spring issue of Michigan Meetings + Events, you’ll find an exclusive interview with the authors of Suddenly Hybrid: Managing the Modern Meeting (Wiley). Emmy-winning broadcaster Karin M. Reed and Joseph A. Allen, Ph.D., a leading expert on workplace meetings, offer a guide to navigating the new normal of meetings where some attendees are in the room and others are Zooming in from remote locations. 

Here’s a preview of the strategies that make hybrid meetings work for team leaders, according to Reed and Allen:

 

The CDC defines close contact as within six feet or less, for 15 minutes or more with someone who tests positive for COVID-19. At gatherings of many kinds, contact tracing is used to trace the people that someone has come into contact with, before they learn that they have tested positive. This allows the people that the sick person came into contact with to be aware of the situation, and to make health-informed choices.