• Gettysburg Reporting High Tourism Numbers

     
    POSTED December 29, 2015
     

The number of overnight stays in Adams County, Pa., through October, is more than 4.1 percent higher than the same timeframe in 2014, according to the Smith Travel Research report which measures hotel occupancy, average daily rates and revenue generated through participating lodging properties.

Lodging is more than 11,000 room nights ahead of 2013—the year the community celebrated the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and the Gettysburg Address.

 

“The anniversary year was not the pinnacle of tourism in Adams County, Pa.,” says Norris Flowers, President of Destination Gettysburg. “It was the beginning to a new era of tourism, and we’re seeing the success of that right now.”

Soon after the landmark event, Destination Gettysburg launched a different marketing approach, focusing on experiences outside of the Civil War and highlight the region’s culinary tourism, shopping, outdoor recreation and other ways for families and younger visitors to enjoy the area.

 

In 2015, through October, more than 393,000 room nights have been reserved, generating nearly $42 million among the hotels that participate in the study of overnight lodging. The average daily rate in 2015 is $106.50, more than $3 higher than 2014.

“These lodging numbers are positive encouragement that the marketing we have implemented is working,” said Flowers.

The Inn at St. John’s in Plymouth changes its name to Saint John’s Resort in August.

It’s part of a rebranding with multiple enhancements that Director of Sales and Marketing Fadi Sibani says make it a true Detroit destination resort.

Formerly owned by the Archdiocese of Detroit as St. John’s Provincial Seminary from 1948 to 1988, the property was transformed in the 1990s as a center for youth and families before it was redeveloped into a hotel and conference center in the 2000s. 

 

First came COVID. Then came the tornado.

The northern Michigan community of Gaylord was just starting to rebound from the pandemic with its groups and events business as a new season was getting underway when a rare EF3 tornado with estimated wind speeds between 136 and 165 miles per hour struck May 20.

Two people were killed and at least 44 were injured, according to official reports at the time. West Michigan meteorologist Bill Steffen said it was the strongest tornado to strike in the U.S. that month. 

 

Six months ago, Detroit’s TCF Center got a new name—Huntington Place. Now the convention center is getting striking new public art—an outdoor sculpture by acclaimed artist Scott Hocking. The 15-foot diameter bronze sculpture, Floating Citadel, will be located in the main circle drive of Huntington Place in downtown Detroit. The installation of the sculpture is expected to be complete by late summer. Renderings and images are available here