The beaches of Wildwoods, N.J., recently received some much-deserved recognition.  

Better Homes & Gardens named Wildwoods to their list ‘Top 10 Beaches You MUST Visit With Your Family.”

Editors and the travel writer of the magazine selected the top 10, which are named in random order. The magazine noted:

“From 1950s mod-style motels to boardwalk custard stands and amusement arcades, this classic Jersey Shore town packs a lot into its 5 miles. Take the kids crabbing, show them your Skeeball prowess, then dance the night away at an evening concert.”

More than nine million people visit the area each year. The beaches, which stretch for 5 miles, are free for visitors. Wildwoods also was recently named TripAdvisor’s No. 1 Destination on the Rise for 2015, as well as a number of awards from different organizations such as FamilyFun magazine and Thrillist.com.  

“We know that nowhere in the state or even in the nation can you find a better free beach or shore destination that offers so much fun, and excitement and free activities to its visitors than in the Wildwoods,” says Siciliano, executive director, Greater Wildwoods Tourism Improvement and Development Authority. “We are thrilled and honored to be recognized nationally by Better Homes & Gardens as a must-visit destination—frankly we couldn’t agree more.”

The Inn at St. John’s in Plymouth changes its name to Saint John’s Resort in August.

It’s part of a rebranding with multiple enhancements that Director of Sales and Marketing Fadi Sibani says make it a true Detroit destination resort.

Formerly owned by the Archdiocese of Detroit as St. John’s Provincial Seminary from 1948 to 1988, the property was transformed in the 1990s as a center for youth and families before it was redeveloped into a hotel and conference center in the 2000s. 

 

First came COVID. Then came the tornado.

The northern Michigan community of Gaylord was just starting to rebound from the pandemic with its groups and events business as a new season was getting underway when a rare EF3 tornado with estimated wind speeds between 136 and 165 miles per hour struck May 20.

Two people were killed and at least 44 were injured, according to official reports at the time. West Michigan meteorologist Bill Steffen said it was the strongest tornado to strike in the U.S. that month. 

 

Six months ago, Detroit’s TCF Center got a new name—Huntington Place. Now the convention center is getting striking new public art—an outdoor sculpture by acclaimed artist Scott Hocking. The 15-foot diameter bronze sculpture, Floating Citadel, will be located in the main circle drive of Huntington Place in downtown Detroit. The installation of the sculpture is expected to be complete by late summer. Renderings and images are available here