• Local Student Cooks for a Cause

     
    POSTED October 15, 2015
     

Chef hats off to local Cherry Hill, N.J., student for flexing his cooking chops for a good cause.

Specifically, Daniel Marcus, an elementary school student, has entered Uncle Ben’s Brand Ben’s Beginners Cooking Contest—a contest through the rice product company’s national program that encourages children to start cooking at an early age to help them make healthier choices.

The contest involves kindergarten through eighth grade children submitting three-minute videos of themselves and their parents cooking an original rice-based dish, bringing the family closer together, making cooking a fun activity and helping kids make healthier meal choices. Anyone can vote by heading to the website and selecting one of the 25 videos. (Hundreds are submitted every year, making Daniel’s entry even more exciting.)  

Typically, both the student’s family and the school of the student that wins receive money, but Daniel has elected to give his school’s money to Sacred Heart, a Camden-based elementary school that doesn’t have a cafeteria.

If selected as one of the five grand prize winners, Daniel’s family will receive $15,000, and Sacred Heart will receive $30,000 for a cafeteria makeover.

Voters can select their favorite from Oct. 15 through Nov. 3. To view Daniel’s video, visit the organization’s website and search for the recipe name: “Daniel’s Steak, Rice and Messy Broccoli Bowl.” Get out and vote for Daniel to help a local elementary school and better the community!

The Inn at St. John’s in Plymouth changes its name to Saint John’s Resort in August.

It’s part of a rebranding with multiple enhancements that Director of Sales and Marketing Fadi Sibani says make it a true Detroit destination resort.

Formerly owned by the Archdiocese of Detroit as St. John’s Provincial Seminary from 1948 to 1988, the property was transformed in the 1990s as a center for youth and families before it was redeveloped into a hotel and conference center in the 2000s. 

 

First came COVID. Then came the tornado.

The northern Michigan community of Gaylord was just starting to rebound from the pandemic with its groups and events business as a new season was getting underway when a rare EF3 tornado with estimated wind speeds between 136 and 165 miles per hour struck May 20.

Two people were killed and at least 44 were injured, according to official reports at the time. West Michigan meteorologist Bill Steffen said it was the strongest tornado to strike in the U.S. that month. 

 

Six months ago, Detroit’s TCF Center got a new name—Huntington Place. Now the convention center is getting striking new public art—an outdoor sculpture by acclaimed artist Scott Hocking. The 15-foot diameter bronze sculpture, Floating Citadel, will be located in the main circle drive of Huntington Place in downtown Detroit. The installation of the sculpture is expected to be complete by late summer. Renderings and images are available here