Musikfest recently unveiled its official 2015 festival artwork, and the results are bright, vibrant and enticing. The work showcases the Lehigh Valley region’s history as well as the festival’s unique past.

Brian Barto, an Emmaus, Pa. native, created the graphic illustration based off of signage found throughout the Lehigh Valley region. He also tied in unique aspects of the festival itself.

“I’ve always had an affinity for old signage that gains it character from a mix of forms, colors, materials and textures,” says Barto. “Given the history of the Lehigh Valley, and the diversity of the crowds, performers and artists who participate in Musikfest, this work of art really seems like a wonderful way to represent the spirit of that entire amalgamation.”

Barto, who currently resides in West Chester, Pa., graduated from Emmaus High School in 1993 and Kutztown University in 1997 with a bachelor’s degree in communication design. He creates artwork by taking discarded and used items and signs and reinterpreting them as regional homages, graphic statements and unique advertising vehicles through a mix of woodworking, painting, illustration and other mediums. He has worked with international brands, regional restaurants, boutiques and more.

The music festival hasn’t commissioned an artist to create its poster artwork since 2005. Barto’s creation will be featured on the Musikfest 2015 website, poster and festival mug, while also used in other merchandise and apparel throughout the year.  

Musikfest, the nation’s largest free music festival, boasts more than 500 performances on 14 stages across Bethlehem, Pa. over 10 days. This year’s 32nd festival will take place Aug. 7–15 

Detroit’s convention center, Huntington Place, not only has a new name—it was formerly called TCF Center—but it also has some new items on the catering menu. Executive chef Stephan Blaser expanded the plant-based selections with a focus on sustainability, took a “whole-animal” approach, expanded the use of made-in-Michigan ingredients and products, and offered more regional favorites.

 

Detroit’s convention center, Huntington Place, not only has a new name—it was formerly called TCF Center—but it also has some new items on the catering menu. Executive chef Stephan Blaser expanded the plant-based selections with a focus on sustainability, took a “whole-animal” approach, expanded the use of made-in-Michigan ingredients and products, and offered more regional favorites.

 

Manistee County has one of the finest collections of historical buildings in Michigan, and a collection of eight themed self-guided tours highlight more than 100 of these sites. But now, thanks to a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Office, the Manistee County Visitors Bureau is expanding these attractions with Origins Walk, set to debut this summer.