• New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge Reveals $45 Million Renovation

     
    POSTED August 5, 2016
     
    Photo credit: Courtesy of New York Marriott

After more than a year, the New York Marriott at the Brooklyn Bridge announced the unveiling of its $45 million transformation, ending a three-phase renovation.

The third phase focused on renovating the 667 guestrooms to mimic the Brooklyn lifestyle, with urban-inspired color pallets, fabrics that emulate the culture and landmarks, and an art piece that zooms in on a piece of a mural that is located in the lobby.

 "Through the hotel’s total metamorphosis, we have accomplished our main goal: to provide an experiential journey into one of the most diverse, innovative and eccentric destinations in the United States and the world,” says Sam Ibrahim, general manager, “Our renovations are deliberate and thoughtful, allowing our guests to take home an authentic taste of the borough,”

The first phase worked on the bar, front desk and M Club Lounge. Phase two focused on the redesign of the Grand Ballroom—the largest in Brooklyn—and its 44,000 square feet of meeting space.

“We began as a leader in New York City hospitality and are proud to continue to set the bar incredibly high in terms of personalized service, innovative design, size and location,” says Joshua Muss, principal of Muss Development and an owner of the hotel. “When Brooklyn Marriott embarked on this $45 million project, we were determined to evolve with our transforming community and uphold our distinguished legacy of welcoming business and leisure travelers to Brooklyn.”

The Inn at St. John’s in Plymouth changes its name to Saint John’s Resort in August.

It’s part of a rebranding with multiple enhancements that Director of Sales and Marketing Fadi Sibani says make it a true Detroit destination resort.

Formerly owned by the Archdiocese of Detroit as St. John’s Provincial Seminary from 1948 to 1988, the property was transformed in the 1990s as a center for youth and families before it was redeveloped into a hotel and conference center in the 2000s. 

 

First came COVID. Then came the tornado.

The northern Michigan community of Gaylord was just starting to rebound from the pandemic with its groups and events business as a new season was getting underway when a rare EF3 tornado with estimated wind speeds between 136 and 165 miles per hour struck May 20.

Two people were killed and at least 44 were injured, according to official reports at the time. West Michigan meteorologist Bill Steffen said it was the strongest tornado to strike in the U.S. that month. 

 

Six months ago, Detroit’s TCF Center got a new name—Huntington Place. Now the convention center is getting striking new public art—an outdoor sculpture by acclaimed artist Scott Hocking. The 15-foot diameter bronze sculpture, Floating Citadel, will be located in the main circle drive of Huntington Place in downtown Detroit. The installation of the sculpture is expected to be complete by late summer. Renderings and images are available here