• Philly Has Record Year

     
    POSTED December 23, 2015
     

Just in time for the new year, Center City Philadelphia is right on track to end 2015 with a record hotel occupancy.

Record Hotel Occupancy: 77.4%:

Center City Philadelphia’s hotel occupancy is estimated to hit a record 77.4 percent in up from 75.5 percent in 2014. Visitors to Philadelphia from all segments (leisure, group, business) will have filled a projected 3.1 million rooms—another record.

Leisure Is One Of Three Major Segments:

The leisure segment of travelers will set a record as well for 2015. Tourists are projected to account for 31 percent of room nights in Center City, as opposed to just 14 percent in 1997, when Visit Philadelphia started marketing the area as a leisure destination (254,000 versus 976,400 room nights—a 284 percent increase).

This means one in every three Center City hotel guests is a leisure traveler.

They fill rooms every day of the week, especially from June through October. In 2015, Saturday night occupancy—a major sign of a city’s strength as a leisure destination—will hit a record 88 percent and take its place as the highest of the week in Center City, as it has been for more than a decade.

Hotel Room Rates:

The 2015 average daily rate is projected to hit $182, another record for Center City. Each segment is showing ADR increases compared to 2014: Commercial is projected to increase 5 percent to $200; group is projected to increase 5 percent to $188; and leisure is projected to increase 4 percent to $166.

“People are coming for Philadelphia—the destination itself is the reason to visit, and travelers are doing it more and more every year,” says Meryl Levitz, president/CEO, Visit Philadelphia. “The pope was here for a weekend; the rest of the year succeeded simply because of Philly.”

As the spread of the novel coronavirus continues to put immense pressure on the U.S. health care system and the people who keep it running, the American Hotel and Lodging Association is working to connect hotels with health workers who are struggling to find housing.

 

With the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, most people are working from home. Many are social distancing or quarantining with their children, who have transitioned to online classes. Restaurants, bars, coffee shops, offices, stores and so much more have been temporarily shut down in many states, affecting daily life in the most unexpected of ways.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Sunday recommended that all gatherings of more than 50 people be cancelled or postponed for the next eight weeks, in order to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. The recommendation covers events like parades, concerts, festivals, conferences, sporting events, weddings and more.