The Spiced Maple Manhattan hails from Traverse City’s new Hotel Indigo. Make it at home yourself or sample it this spring at the Indigo rooftop gathering following our 12th annual Best of Michigan readers’ choice awards.

INGREDIENTS:
—2 dashes orange bitters
—1 cherry
—1 orange slice
—1.5 T Vanilla Cinnamon Maple Simple Syrup (see below)
—2 oz. Traverse City Cherry Whiskey
—1 T sweet vermouth
—1 cinnamon stick for garnish

DIRECTIONS:
1. Combine cherry, orange slice, bitters and simple syrup.
2. Add ice.
3. Pour in whiskey and vermouth.
4. Tumble.
5. Garnish with cinnamon stick and serve. 

Vanilla Cinnamon Maple Simple Syrup

INGREDIENTS:
—16 oz. sugar
—16 oz. water
—3 open vanilla beans
—6 oz. Michigan maple syrup
—.25 teaspoon cinnamon

DIRECTIONS:
1. Combine the sugar and water and boil for 10 minutes.
2. Add the vanilla beans and boil for another three minutes.
3. Add the maple syrup and stir, boiling for one more minute.
4. Turn heat to low and add the cinnamon; cook for two more minutes.
5. Remove from heat. Strain and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate and use as needed.

Courtesy of HOTEL INDIGO 231.932.0500

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