• Tips For Using Social Media In Meetings And Events

     
    POSTED December 18, 2016
     

A study on the important of social media in the meetings and events industry conducted by American Express Meetings & Events found usage of social media has increased in the industry, and about 45 percent of planners see the value in online engagement. Neemah Persad-Celestine is an executive of Hyatt Regency Trinidad, and responsible for all Hyatt Regency Trinidad’s social media, understands this and is an advocate for using social media in all aspects of planning.

From the beginning to the after stages of event planning, social media can be utilized to measure and improve events based on audience engagement and feedback. Social media is a great way to hear the opinions of attendees, and makes attendees feel engaged. So, Hyatt Regency Trinidad created a list of best practices for using social media during meetings and events.

First, use social media to create excitement. Generate buzz around your event by using word of mouth. Inform your audience about what to expect, and how to prepare, answer their questions and provide them with advice on how to make the most out of their experience. Hyatt Regency Trinidad creates Facebook events for large events like their New Year’s Eve Gala and their annual Carnival event, which are some of their most highly anticipated events each year.

Second, use social media to engage your audience. Post real-time, and encourage your guests to take photos and share their opinions. Get our audience engaged in a conversation with you, the speakers, and other attendees about the event itself. A great way to get people engaged is through specific hashtags for the event. Ask guests to follow the hashtag and make sure to use the hashtag for all their posts, too.

Third, use social media to follow up with attendees. Keep the buzz going even after the event has finished, and thank your audience for attending. You can create a flipbook of images and memories created at the event, reminisce on experiences, and use hashtags to keep the conversation going. This will encourage attendees to attend future events.

The Inn at St. John’s in Plymouth changes its name to Saint John’s Resort in August.

It’s part of a rebranding with multiple enhancements that Director of Sales and Marketing Fadi Sibani says make it a true Detroit destination resort.

Formerly owned by the Archdiocese of Detroit as St. John’s Provincial Seminary from 1948 to 1988, the property was transformed in the 1990s as a center for youth and families before it was redeveloped into a hotel and conference center in the 2000s. 

 

First came COVID. Then came the tornado.

The northern Michigan community of Gaylord was just starting to rebound from the pandemic with its groups and events business as a new season was getting underway when a rare EF3 tornado with estimated wind speeds between 136 and 165 miles per hour struck May 20.

Two people were killed and at least 44 were injured, according to official reports at the time. West Michigan meteorologist Bill Steffen said it was the strongest tornado to strike in the U.S. that month. 

 

Six months ago, Detroit’s TCF Center got a new name—Huntington Place. Now the convention center is getting striking new public art—an outdoor sculpture by acclaimed artist Scott Hocking. The 15-foot diameter bronze sculpture, Floating Citadel, will be located in the main circle drive of Huntington Place in downtown Detroit. The installation of the sculpture is expected to be complete by late summer. Renderings and images are available here